Environment/Energy

Wisconsin mining law reforms benefit polluters

"After the passage of Act 1 [the Bad River Watershed Destruction Act], one of the last protections for ecologically critical watersheds in gold and base metal exploration areas in Oneida, Taylor and Marathon counties is the Mining Moratorium Law," write Al Gedicks of WNPJ member group Wisconsin Resources Protection Council (and former WNPJ Board member) and Dave Blouin of the Sierra Club in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Yet mining companies have said their top priority is repealing Wisconsin's mining moratorium - also called the "prove it first" law.

"That the North American mining industry cannot meet the Moratorium Law is a problem of its own making and purely reflects the fact that mining metallic sulfide ores remains proven to be unsafe," add Gedicks and Blouin.  "Our clean air and drinking water and the critical habitats and healthy environment we all depend on are threatened by the mining industry's so-called reforms."

Conservation Congress passes resolutions against mining law

A resolution to repeal the Iron Mining Bill (SB/AB 1) submitted by WNPJ members and allies at the April 8 Conservation Congress passed by wide margins in all four counties in which it was introduced. The total vote was 49-6 in Clark County, 221-67 in Dane County, 32-6 in LaCrosse County, and 158 to 79 in Milwaukee County. Total 460 yes, 158 no. The vote tallies are especially significant considering the resolution did not come to the floor for discussion until the end of the formal agenda, around 11:00 p.m. in Dane County.

Why are we rebuilding H-bombs?

"Without a public uproar, U.S. could spend more than $600 billion on nuclear weapons over the next 10 years," warns John LaForge of WNPJ member group Nukewatch, in a Counterpunch article

"For 2014, the President plans a nuclear weapons spending increase over the current level of $7.227 billion. Where’s the money to come from? Taking a page from the Reagan/Thatcher play book, Obama plans to get it from the nuclear non-proliferation budget."

Madison encouraging fossil fuel divestments

The fossil fuel divestment campaign organized locally by 350 Madison, a WNPJ member group, can celebrate a victory.

"Mayor Paul Soglin announced Thursday that Madison will join nine other U.S. cities in a campaign to encourage divestment of city funds from the fossil fuel industry," reports the Wisconsin State Journal.

"Soglin said Madison doesn't have any funds invested in fossil fuel companies but will introduce a resolution encouraging the Madison School District, Dane County, UW-Madison, the state and other local governments to divest their holdings."

Widespread environmental violations at WI frac sand mines

Almost 20% of Wisconsin's 70 operating frac sand mines and processing plants were cited for environmental violations in 2012, according to data obtained by the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism. 80 to 90 percent of sand industry operators were issued letters of noncompliance, a reversal of the typical statistics for a regulated industry, according to DNR air management engineer Marty Sellers.

GTac's proposal: Not your grandparents' mine

"Take a moment to think about Northern Wisconsin’s Penokee Hills. Picture the vast swath of forested ridges, the shady glens where pristine water flows from headwaters springs," WNPJ member Eric Hansen writes for Milwaukee Public Media.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel also carried a version of Hansen's column.

GTac's proposed open-pit iron mine would not be "a mine our grandparents would recognize, a minor incision. This is the new style mining -- a mountaintop removal mine project that would turn a unique part of Northern Wisconsin into a West Virginia-like Land of Sorrow."

Energy Self Sufficiency: The SOUL of a greener Wisconsin

WNPJ member group SOUL (Save Our Unique Lands) of the Kickapoo has been building the movement against high-voltage transmission lines planned to criss-cross Wisconsin, being pushed by American Transmission Company to supply industrial customers with dirty coal power from the Dakotas and destructive hydroelectric power from Manitoba.

Hundreds attend Save Our Water - No Unsafe Mines rally

Saturday's rally in support of clean water, treaty rights, Wisconsin's "prove it first" mining safeguards and a healthy, sustainable economy drew hundreds of people to the state Capitol.

"The bill that's before the legislature now sets a very dangerous precedent for our state's environmental laws," WNPJ's Carl Sack told WXOW from La Crosse.  Other media covering the rally included WORT 89.9 FM, the Badger Herald and Daily Cardinal.

In related news, a Wisconsin Democracy Campaign analysis shows that supporters of mining deregulation gave Governor Walker $11.34 million and state legislators $4.25 million since 2010.

Photo:  Members of the Bad River Tribe address the crowd at the state Capitol on January 26.  Click here to see other pictures from the rally.

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